Picture this:  

You’re standing in front of the cutting table at your favorite quilt shop with at least 20 bolts of fabric. You’re planning a quilt for a wedding/baby/birthday…you get the idea. But you’ve come prepared this time, red glasses in hand, one eye squinty, and your best quilty friend to keep you in check. After what seems like years of searching,  (although it’s only been an hour, and you’re actually just Hangry) you buy twice as much as you need, and hope you don’t change your mind.

I have news…

WE HAVE ALL BEEN THERE.

Even the most put together quilter you know, who does things with color and pattern that you can’t even imagine has been there.

 

What does all of this have to do with Quilt-Pro, you ask?

Today I’m going to show you one of the great features that everyone can use in QP. Auditioning fabrics and colors within your quilt patterns is easy with Quilt-Pro!

Let’s explore how many different blocks we can create, all without changing anything—it’s all in the coloring! Using the paint tools in Quilt-Pro, you can try out different colors and fabrics and create new looks just by recoloring the patches in the block.

We are using the Block of the Day from July, 31st, Campfire.

The original coloring

The true beauty in this feature, to me, is that it can be used with colors AND fabrics. Gone are the days of lugging out colored pencils, graph paper, rulers, etc. If you use this technique in a full quilt, rather than the blocks like I’ve done here, then it even acts as your own digital design wall.

All these variations took me about 5 minutes to make, and what I’ve shown here is just scratching the surface of Color Auditioning.  

If you would like to learn more about Quilt-Pro’s color and fabric libraries and how you can use them in your next project, click here.

Comments (2)

Even more fun is doing a quilt layout. Using the same principles, you can come up with unique quilt designs that you won’t find in quilt books and keeps people guessing. By combining two blocks and using non-traditional color schemes, you become a quilt designer. Nothing wrong with using kits and patterns- but isn’t creativity the one thing that drew you to Quilt-Pro?

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